Category Archives: Uncategorized

Fall Frightfest Oct. 2, 2018

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October 2: 6 Souls. Rating: 3/5. Comment: This movie greatly divided the Fornelli household. Half of us thought it was ok — a solid 3 stars — and the other half thought it was a 1 star movie, so we compromised and gave it 3 stars. The main characters were memorable and the actors were super good-looking and incredibly talented. The plot started off really interesting and creepy, but waned halfway through. It’d have been alright by me if the movie had been titled 5 Souls and they edited it way down from its nearly 2 hour length. I’d argue it’s definitely worth a watch, if only to see Hottie McHotpsycho change personalities so believably. But, like, I’m not sure of the message. Don’t vaccinate kids? Trust hillbilly witch grannies? Distrust all mentally ill people? Remain skeptical of psychologists? Huh. Work that one out for yourself, I guess.

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Frightfest: Oct. 31, 2017

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October 31: The Lost Boys. Rating: 4/5. Comment: This was a fairly solid 80’s movie, so if you don’t like big hair, bright colors, and disjointed soundtracks, you likely won’t enjoy this film. However, I thought Kiefer Sutherland and the Coreys did a great job, the plot moved along at a quick pace, there was an interesting and successful misdirection, and I liked it. Another Fall Fornelli Frightfest successfully in the books.

Peace and love.

Frightfest: Oct. 2, 2017

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October 2: The Damned. Rating: 3/5. Comment: This flick has an interesting plot, though there are holes in it that weaken its rating. That being said, it is possible that, due to the impossibly fast subtitles, I may have missed or misunderstood some events, thus leading this to be classified under the quite rare personal “rewatch for clarification” recommendation.

Peace and love.

Nonfiction November Reading Challenge

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Since nonfiction is one of my favorite reading genres, I have decided to participate in a reading challenge I discovered on YouTube for the month of November. The challenge has become very popular among the YouTube community as well as among Goodreads members. I have picked my four novels for the month based on the challenge categories of the creators, Gemma (whose YouTube channel is Non Fic Books) and Olive (who is known on YouTube as abookolive). They are using #NonfictionNovember2016 as the hashtag to find the tbr of everyone who is participating.

 

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The categories of the challenges, along with my selections for each, are as follows.

1.New: A book on a subject about which you know very little or one that is new to your collection or interest level. For this choice I picked The War That Killed Achilles: The True Story of Homer’s Iliad and the Trojan War by Caroline Alexander. I teach part of Homer’s Iliad to my seniors every year, and it has always been one of my favorites, so when I found this recently I bought it immediately and without hesitation. It is brand new to my collection, though it was published in 2009, and finding out more about the actual history surrounding the Trojan War is an exciting prospect for me.

2.Fascinating: A book on a subject in which you are highly interested — one you can’t wait to read on a topic that you love. For this category, I have chosen, and already started reading, The Boston Strangler by Gerold Frank. I am a huge fan of true crime novels, and this is an in-depth look at the evidence and police action during the investigation of a serial killer who, until only recently, had completely mystified the Boston police department since the middle of the last century.

3.Controversial: A book on a topic about which people might have opposing views. For this category, I have chosen A First-Rate MadnessUncovering the Links Between Leadership and Mental Illness by Nassir Ghaemi. I have been incredibly excited to read this book since I purchased it a few years ago, but somehow it just kept getting shoved to the back of my tbr time after time. I knew that adding it to this reading challenge would finally push me to get around to this controversial little number, which discusses how some of our most famous and infamous world leaders have all had similar qualities, personality traits, and characteristics verging, unfortunately, on the brink of insanity. Considering the premise, I think this novel would start a number of excellent debates among historians as well as mental health experts.

4.Important: A book you think an educated person should read, which helps people understand the world or others around them. For this choice I selected History’s Worst Crimes and the People Who Investigated Them by Bill Price. This is one in a collection of similar books by the same author, and, as previously noted, I am a true crime fan, so this one in particular is right up my alley. I thought that if I check this off the list, it might encourage me to read the others like it in our personal library. It also seems like it will be a very quick read. It fits the category because it shows that, unfortunately, terrible, baffling crimes occur during all times and all over the world; it is a reality we must face if we hope to prevent them in the future.

Join me in this challenge! I would love to hear your thoughts on the books you choose.

Peace and love.

October 16, 2016 Fall Frightfest

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October 16: A Good Marriage. Rating: 5/5. Comment: Based on a Stephen King short story, this movie left us both staring, unblinking, at the other and thinking, “I really hope I’m not married to a sociopath.” I enjoyed the book and I liked the movie, specifically because realistic horror is the scariest since IT COULD HAPPEN TO ME (theoretically). Funnily enough, when this flick ended, I actually did tell Josh for, probably, the thousandth time, “I wish we lived in New England. It’s so beautiful and I want a Maine accent.” Apparently, I’m willing to risk running into a serial killer, as long as he will bury me under a 75 foot Sugar Maple.

Peace and love.

October 4, 2016 Fall Frightfest

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October 4: The Den. Rating:2/5. Comment: Where do I begin in describing the many flaws that render this flick unrealistic and excruciating? I know: no one tracks, kidnaps, and murders the friends and family of a complete stranger they are stalking. No one. Does not happen. Ever. A reason for this behavior was never given, either. We were just expected to believe a group of anonymous murderers were tormenting the heroine by killing her loved ones to drive her mad before they finally put her out of her misery, I guess. Maybe I just missed the explanation for why this huge gang of masked sadists had such rage for this one innocent, average woman they happened upon in an online site. The whole plot line is insulting to our intelligence. Another aspect of this movie that is alarmingly off-key is the inexplicable nature of the minor characters’ reactions to changing events. All but the protagonist were basically parodies of horror movie stock characters. Does the screenwriter even know other real life people? My working theory is that the director of the movie is a hermit who had never actually met another living human being prior to beginning filming. I suppose it is just as likely that the producer is a thirteen-year-old. But, those are the only two plausible explanations. My final complaint is the confusion surrounding the general framework of the film: the entire movie is supposed to be filmed via a webcam on someone’s laptop that’s been hacked. Older people would find the technology-based structure confusing and hard to follow, with multiple windows constantly opening and closing on her screen. Younger people will think the prospect of an anonymous chat room so old-fashioned as to be rendered laughable and inane. I’d hate to think I, myself, the earliest of the Millennial generation, a stable career woman with a strong interest in social media, am the target audience. They must think I am a moron. And maybe I am, since I watched this cheap “found footage” flick all the way through. Maybe I am.

Peace and love.

Flashback: October 1, 2010 Fall Frightfest

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In keeping with Josh’s and my tradition of watching a scary/Halloween-themed video every night in October, I will try to remember to give my opinion (for what it’s worth) on our movies. (That way, you won’t have to waste your time on rubbish.)

October 1: Garfield’s Halloween. Rating: 5/5. Comment: It’s a classic. A must-see. Fun for the whole family. How could you go wrong?

Peace and love.